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Tag: Philosophy

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Understanding Plato!

Have you ever wanted a concise but also in-depth exploration of Plato and Plato’s political philosophy? After all, he was not only the first “philosopher” of the West but also the first political philosopher of the West. In fact, removing Plato from the context of political philosophy does tremendous harm to understanding Plato and engaging with his dialogues. In this […]

Classics 0

Dante’s Purgatorio in 20 Minutes!

In this episode of Literary Tales, we proceed to examine Dante’s Purgatorio where it left off from The Inferno. In this episode we learn how Dante uses poetry as a theme and symbol for beauty, goodness, and love in guiding us to the ultimate Beauty, Goodness, and Love in Heaven.

Theology 0

Augustine’s City of God: The Two Cities

In this episode of Literary Tales we continue our examination of Augustine’s City of God and explore his juxtaposition of the two cities: The City of Man and the City of God and delve into how the privation of love leads to lust (the city of man) and how love of God and neighbors is the only true reality deserving […]

Classics 0

Violence, Love, and the Sacred in Ovid’s Metamorphoses

In this episode of Literary Tales we explore Ovid’s Metamorphoses and the juxtapositional dialectic of love and violence relating to metamorphosis (change or transformation) in the great mytho-poetic masterpiece of one of Rome’s great sensual poets. This lecture, in particular, focuses on the stories of Perseus and Andromeda; Pygmalion and the Statue; and Acis and Galatea.  

Theology 0

Augustine’s City of God: The Critique of Rome

In this episode of the Philosophy Hour of Literary Tales we explore the magnum opus of Saint Augustine: The City of God. The first half of the City of God is, for a lack of a better word, the first work of systematic cultural critique in the Western World. In it, Augustine deconstructs the “hypnotizing myth of Rome” to “expose […]

Theology 0

Everything You Need to Know About Augustine’s Confessions

In this episode of Literary Tales, we read one of the great classics of the Western world from the man whom Robin Lane Fox called one of the smartest and most insightful men who ever lived: St. Augustine’s Confessions. In exploring the Confessions we concentrate on the so-called mystical visions of Augustine and how they are intimately tied to Augustine’s […]

Classics 0

Sophocles: From Tragedy to Hope

In this episode of Literary Tales we explore the great Greek poet playwright Sophocles and offer a reading of some of his surviving plays (Oedipus Rex, Antigone, and Electra) and how they revolve around the themes of filial decadence, dissolution, and deliverance in the broader movement of “Tragedy.” Family loyalty and dissolution, I argue, is the context to Sophoclean tragedy […]

English Literature 0

The Real Meaning of “Gulliver’s Travels”

In this episode of Literary Tales we fast forward to the great English poet, writer, and clergyman Jonathan Swift and examine his monumental and enduring satirical travel-book Gulliver’s Travels. Far from a fanciful and funny children’s story (which we have inherited due to several films very much detached from the work), we realize Swift’s profound criticism of the Enlightenment, modern philosophy, and emerging […]

Classics 0

Half Hour Herodotus: Complete Summary of “The Histories”

In this episode of the Philosophy Hour at Literary Tales we pivot to an examination of the “Father of History” Herodotus and his infamous book The Histories. Is there some unifying theme to this seemingly disparate work? Indeed there is. Historia, in Greek, means inquiry. And what Herodotus inquires about is the nature of human action. He finds, over the […]

Ancient Philosophy 0

Introduction to Plato and Philosophy

In the inaugural lecture of the “Philosophy Hour” at Literary Tales, we begin with the very source of systematic philosophy: Plato. In this half hour lecture we provide the tools for understanding Plato as a political thinker, ethicist, satirist, and architect of foreshadowing. This lecture introduces the reader/listener to how to extract the richness from Plato primarily by drawing these […]